signs to put dog to sleep and what happens during pet euthanasia

Signs To Put Your Dog To Sleep And What Happens During Pet Euthanasia?

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A major consideration for any owner is the signs to put dog to sleep and what happens during pet euthanasia? The process of putting your dog to sleep, clinically known as pet euthanasia, is not something that you want to put your mind on. However, there is a time in many dogs’ lives that pet euthanasia needs to be considered. When your dog’s quality of life has deteriorated so much, putting them to sleep peacefully is often the best option. 

There is no-one that knows your dog as well as you do, and your vet is the best person to help and advise you on what is best for your pet. Making the incredibly difficult decision about whether to put your dog to sleep is best made if you know what happens during pet euthanasia. Some people even suffer depression after the loss of a pet, so knowing the  signs to put dog to sleep and what happens during pet euthanasia is essential to help you cope.

Putting Your Dog To Sleep – The Pet Euthanasia Process

We will take you through a step-by-step guide of what to expect when you have decided to put your dog to sleep.

  1. Consult Your Vet

Before making the incredibly distressful decision to go through with pet euthanasia, you should first consult with your vet. They will be able to complete a precise diagnosis of your dog’s condition. There may be options for your pet to undergo surgery, be treated at home, or take a course of specialist drugs.

  1. Quality of Life Assessment

The quality of life that your dog has gets assessed as objectively as possible. Your vet will conduct a 5H2M assessment giving you a score, and you can provide your score based on your evaluation. The 5H2M assessment covers the following aspects:

  • Hurt
  • Hunger
  • Hygiene
  • Hydration
  • Happiness
  • Mobility
  • Mostly good days or bad
  1. Considerations of Pet Euthanasia

Although devastating for any pet owner, putting your dog to sleep is often the best option. Pet euthanasia allows your dog to pass away gently, peacefully, and painlessly. You can be with your beloved friend right to the end. However, it is an incredibly difficult decision to make, and you may feel regret or guilt afterward. These are normal, and only to be expected, but you will be consoled by knowing you acted in the interests of your dog.

  1. Final Care

When you’ve decided to go ahead with pet euthanasia, you should do everything possible to make their final days as comfortable as possible. Provide them with a sleeping spot that is clean, quiet, and warm. Surround your pet with their favourite toys and familiar blankets and bedding. Check them regularly to ensure they have not soiled themselves or their bed. Be there for them as much as is possible.

  1. Inform Your Family and Friends About the Pet Euthanasia

Informing your family and friends about the decision to put your dog to sleep will allow them to say goodbye. Sharing this information will also give those people the chance to support you through this challenging period. Support from friends and family will be required before, during, and after your dog gets put to sleep. Try to educate younger ones about why the decision to opt for pet euthanasia was in their loving pet’s best interests.

  1. Saying Goodbye to Your Dog

Your dog will be unaware of what is going on. Give them plenty of love and affection during their final moments. Express your feelings of love, joy, and affection that you shared with your friend. Saying these words to your pet will help you find closure when they have gone. 

The vet will give your pet a sedative to keep them calm, and they will feel nothing else apart from their relaxed state. When they have drifted into a deep sleep, the vet will administer a second injection, and your pet will pass away peacefully. 

Not everyone wants to be present during the final stages of pet euthanasia, and this is fine. There is also an option to conduct the procedure in your home. Home is often the best location to say goodbye and avoids any potential stress of travel for your dog.

  1. Whether to Bury or Cremate Your Pet?

Many pet owners want to have a special place to remember their dogs. Pet cemeteries or in your garden give you the opportunity of having a special area of remembrance.

Cremation is another option, and you either keep the ashes in an urn or scatter them at your special place. Everyone has different circumstances, and only you will know what is right for your beloved pet.

  1. Grieving After Pet Euthanasia

Everyone will grieve in their own way. Some everyday things to help with the grieving process are to keep photos of your pet, or one of their toys, plant a tree, or conduct a small memorial service.

People that have never owned a dog may not understand the bond between the pet and the owner. Reach out to friends and family that knew your pet and seek their support. As we recommend above, keeping them informed will ensure they’re there for you after the pet euthanasia.

Remember the happy times you shared with your dog, and try to get back to normal as soon as possible.

Conclusion

Hopefully, this article has made you aware of the signs to put dog to sleep and what happens during pet euthanasia? It will help you better cope should the time come when you have put your dog to sleep.

 

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by Stewert Brightonic on October 13, 2020

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Signs To Put Your Dog To Sleep And What Happens During Pet Euthanasia?

A major consideration for any owner is the signs to put dog to sleep and what happens during pet euthanasia? The process of putting your dog […]

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We are available to help you with home euthanasia for your pet

In order to safeguard you and our vets and to comply with Government regulations there are some requirements you should be aware of and agree to before we confirm your home visit:
1. If the gentle euthanasia is indoors, only one person can be present during the vet’s visit, other family or friends should say their goodbyes before the vet arrives at your home
2. There should, at all times, be a two meter distance between the family member and the vet.
3. Our process involves sedation, you will be able share closeness with your pet after the vet has given the sedative
4. If you are able to be in your own garden, this greatly reduces the risk of contagion and it may be possible to be more than one person to be with the vet, our vet will advise you.
5. We are doing all we can to ensure there is closeness, care and compassion during the gentle euthanasia home visit. A peaceful goodbye is so important at such a sensitive and emotional time
6. Thank you for your understanding and consideration in these very difficult and challenging times.