Compassionate Pet Euthanasia - Should I Put My Cat Down?

Compassionate Pet Euthanasia – Should I Put My Cat Down? What To Expect With Pet Euthanasia And What You Should Ask Your Vet

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Deciding to opt for pet euthanasia for your beloved cat is one of the most distressing and difficult decisions you will ever have to make. However, it is often the most painless and peaceful option available for your loving companion. it is a difficult question – Compassionate Pet Euthanasia – Should I Put My Cat Down?

Understanding the process involved in pet euthanasia will help you should the time come when you need to make such a decision. Getting an understanding of the process involves asking your vet the right questions. We hope that this article will give you an idea of what to expect when putting your cat to sleep, and what questions you should ask your vet beforehand.

 

Understanding When To Consider Pet Euthanasia For Your Cat

 

As they get older, cats are prone to a range of age-related illnesses like the rest of us. It is possible to manage these illnesses with medication and other treatments. However, the time may come when your companion’s quality of life has deteriorated too far. At this point, you may need to consider putting your cat to sleep.

Initially, the need to make this decision might come as a shock. However, as a loving owner and friend to your cat, you make this decision in its best interests.

 

What is the Process of Pet Euthanasia?

 

There are several stages in the pet euthanasia process, covered in greater detail in other blogs. When it comes to the act of putting your cat to sleep, the vet will give your pet two injections. The first one is a sedative to put your pet into a deep sleep. This deep sleep ensures that your cat will feel nothing when the second pet euthanasia injection is administered.

The effects of the second injection act within a minute or so. Your cat’s heart will stop beating, and they will pass away peacefully and painlessly.

You should be aware of a few reactions that can occur when your cat is being put to sleep. Sometimes they will take a deep breath at the end, and it is also possible for them to urinate and defecate. These are natural nervous reactions, and they take place once your pet has already passed away. Understanding that these things can take place will prepare you if they do.

You should also understand that your cat’s eyes may not shut completely. You, a friend, or the vet will have to do this at the end of the pet euthanasia process.

 

Questions To Ask Your Vet

 

We commonly get asked questions, and you should ask your vet about the pet euthanasia process. The key question of course is Compassionate Pet Euthanasia – Should I Put My Cat Down?

 

Will Pet Euthanasia Be Painful For My Cat?

 

The simple answer to this is No! The word ‘euthanasia’ translates into English as ‘good death.’ Pet euthanasia allows your cat to pass away peacefully and painlessly rather than having a drawn-out death and suffering from a terminal condition. Putting your cat to sleep rather than letting it suffer is acting in the best interest of your special companion, and giving them a dignified passing.

 

Where Does the Pet Euthanasia Take Place?

 

Putting your cat to sleep can be done in the vet’s surgery or at your home. It is essential that you are comfortable with the location. If selecting to have the procedure carried out in the vet’s surgery, you should consider when fewer people will be around. A surgery procedure will mean that you have less time to say goodbye to your cat, so you should consider saying goodbye correctly at home beforehand.

 

The other option is to have the pet euthanasia done at home. A home option is often best as your pet will feel comfortable in its surroundings, and you will have a peaceful, familiar environment in which to say goodbye. 

 

Do You Need To Be Present When The Pet Euthanasia Takes Place?

 

Whether you are present during your pet’s final moments or a friend or family member takes your place is your decision. Indeed, if you want to be with your beloved companion and comfort them to the end, you can do this. If it is too upsetting for you or your family to be there at the end, this also is fine.

 

What Are The Costs of Pet Euthanasia?

 

There is a cost associated with putting your cat to sleep. You should speak with your vet beforehand to ensure you are aware of all the fees. Your vet will approach this delicate subject sensitively, and you could also leave these discussions to a friend or family member.

 

What Happens After the Pet Euthanasia?

 

You may have a special place in your garden where you want to lay your cat to rest. Alternatively, there might be a pet cemetery in your local area that will allow somewhere to go for remembrance. There is also an option to have your cat cremated and keep the ashes at home, or scatter them in a special place. Cloud9 Vets can advise you on Compassionate Pet Euthanasia – Should I Put My Cat Down?

 

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by Stewert Brightonic on October 13, 2020

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Compassionate Pet Euthanasia – Should I Put My Cat Down? What To Expect With Pet Euthanasia And What You Should Ask Your Vet

Deciding to opt for pet euthanasia for your beloved cat is one of the most distressing and difficult decisions you will ever have to make. However, […]

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We are available to help you with home euthanasia for your pet

In order to safeguard you and our vets and to comply with Government regulations there are some requirements you should be aware of and agree to before we confirm your home visit:
1. If the gentle euthanasia is indoors, only one person can be present during the vet’s visit, other family or friends should say their goodbyes before the vet arrives at your home
2. There should, at all times, be a two meter distance between the family member and the vet.
3. Our process involves sedation, you will be able share closeness with your pet after the vet has given the sedative
4. If you are able to be in your own garden, this greatly reduces the risk of contagion and it may be possible to be more than one person to be with the vet, our vet will advise you.
5. We are doing all we can to ensure there is closeness, care and compassion during the gentle euthanasia home visit. A peaceful goodbye is so important at such a sensitive and emotional time
6. Thank you for your understanding and consideration in these very difficult and challenging times.